਀ഊ ਀ഊ ਀ഊThe official website of writer Caren Lissner, author of Carrie Pilby ਀ഊ ਀ഊ ਀ഊ ਀ഊ ਀ഊ ਀ഊ ਀ഊ ਀ഊ ਀ഊ ਀ഊ ਀ഊ ਀ഊ ਀ഊ ਀ഊ ਀ഊ ਀ഊ ਀ഊ ਀ഊ ਀ഊ
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Caren Lissner
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Blog entries around the web mentioning Carrie Pilby

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"J's" journal, June 27

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I read the greatest book. I know I am supposed to read intellectual books, but I love reading “trash” for my brain. My dad would shoot me if knew the filth that I read. But anyway, the book “Carrie Pilby” is the best. It is about this girl that is 19, a genius, just graduated from Harvard, and she lacks all social skills. She ends up having to make a list of things that she loves and is commanded to do them by her therapist. She is also given a list of 5 things that she has to do by New Years. The book is about her crazy ride through life as she tries to complete the five things on her list. It’s amazing. It’s not one of those sappy books with the girl gets the guy ending, but the ending really is amazing. I guess the book is about figuring out who you are as a person and holding tight to that. I must agree that is a really good idea. One of my favorite parts is when she writes down the list of her favorite things. I guess I realized yesterday that I have been depriving myself of lots of my favorite things. I ended up spending lots of time jumping around today singing and dancing to my favorite songs. It just felt good to be crazy for once. ਀ഊ

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Sarah's weblog, June 20

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਀ഊi just read a book called Carrie Pilby. it's pretty good, especially if you're the kind of person who has trouble relating to...other people. she's like this genius with all these high moral standards but very little experience in anything, and it's just about her emotional growth. it's a pretty good book, i recommend it. ਀ഊ

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਀ഊDenise's weblog, June 14 ਀ഊ

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਀ഊI also bought the new Radiohead album and am really enjoying it so far (download the song "2 + 2 = 5"). Besides that, I bought a new book: Carrie Pilby by Caren Lissner, which seemed very interesting when I read the first couple pages, but I'm not sure how it'll turn out, so I may exchange it for something else. ਀ഊ

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਀ഊSrah, Michigan, June 11 ਀ഊ

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਀ഊ"I wouldn't have such trouble adjusting to the world if the world made sense."
਀ഊI'm reading Carrie Pilby by Caren Lissner. I identify with the main character because she's a 19-year-old genius with no friends or social skills. Except I have friends and moderate social skills. And I'm not 19. And... well, okay, I'm not a genius either.
਀ഊ"I've always thought that my thoughts would someday serve a great purpose in the world, but the more days that pass, the more unlikely it seems. I've considered starting a log of my thoughts and ideas, but I fear if I do, I'll feel obligated to run to the log and write down every thought I have, and it will become an obsession. Maybe I can limit it to ten brilliant thoughts per day. But I think picking the ten best could be hard."
਀ഊIf I wrote down everything I thought, I would have no readers at all. ਀ഊ

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਀ഊKaci's journal, June 10 ਀ഊ

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਀ഊI was sitting alone, reading a book I have bought recently called Carrie Pilby by Caren Lissner (which I suggest you go read). It’s a great book. It has an interesting plot, but ultimately it addresses morality and the search of one’s self through a witty, yet sarcastic character. Anyway, I was sitting considering the points of the book, and I felt a sudden need to get up and do something. My legs started getting that antsy feeling. ਀ഊ

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਀ഊAnonymous, July 4 ਀ഊ

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਀ഊHappy 4th to all americans who are going to do the right thing and blow shit up tonight. Just dont do it near my house or i will have to kill you. Things could not be better at the moment. I am recovering from my recent breakdown type thing and have decided to no longer eat meat after i have my one last meal from KFC. It will not be that hard since i have lived without it before. I am currently reading Carrie Pilby. It is a really good book so far and i am almost finished then i will move on to either Jemima J or The Pact. Any recomendations would be good. ਀ഊ

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਀ഊSomeone on Diaryland, June 23 ਀ഊ

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਀ഊI also just finished this book, Carrie Pilby, which was good. She suggests that a guy asking to know your middle name means that he likes you a lot, in the same way that guys observe whether a girl will lean over and unlock the driver's side door for them. Well, I added the car door example myself, but it's in some movie, isn't it? Is it John Cusack? But anyway, little tests is the point. ਀ഊ

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਀ഊErica's web log, June 26 ਀ഊ

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਀ഊReading...excerps from books published by Red Dress Ink. Although the imprint is owned by Harlequin, I am delighted with the sharp, sardonic writing and smart, outsider female protagonists. I stumbled upon Carrie Pilby at the bookstore tonight and delighted in Rough Guide to Love in New York. Both books seemed almost as familiar as if I'd written them myself. It gives me hope that there's a market for my fiction out there. ਀ഊ

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਀ഊA Vancouver, B.C. weblog, May 30 ਀ഊ

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਀ഊI am on a self-imposed book (and CD and tea) buying ban. Over the last couple of months I've been really, really good but, on Wednesday night I broke down and bought two new books. ...The second book is a novel entitled Carrie Pilby written by Caren Lissner. This book attracted me for three reasons. First, Carrie Pibly is described as "a person of high intelligence who struggles to make sense of the world as it relates to morality, relationships, sex and leaving her apartment". Second, it is a novel and I so rarely read novels that when I find an interesting one, I tend to snap it up and tear through it. Third, it is published by what I assumed to be an independant publisherRed Dress Ink. Although I had never heard them, they looked like an independent publisher. Much to my surprise and subsequent horror, they are owned by Harlequin Enterprises, the publisher of Harlequin Romances! Oh well, everyone deserves a little escapism sometimes and I guess it's my turn for a little light reading to accompany all the heady books I read. ਀ഊ

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਀ഊCabbie, college freshman/punk, August 2 ਀ഊ

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਀ഊSo the trip home last night from Florida was fine... I bought a book to read on the plane, it's called Carrie Pilby... I can't think of the author's name off the top of my head but I'll put it in sometime. I was expecting it to be some trite chick-flick-on-paper book, but I'm really enjoying it. It's about this neurotic 19-year old genius who has trouble with social interaction and moral relativism. I suppose that sounds really boring... but the writing is fun and light, and interspersed with intelligent/witty commentary that you could believe would come from a 19-year old prodigy. Also, I have a weakness for it because the main plotline is about her trying to fulfill these goals her therapist has set out for her... so it's a therapy book too! Oh good golly, it's fun. The plane ride was nice... except there were about 4 screaming babies like 2 rows in front of me. ਀ഊ

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਀ഊUpdate: Cabbie (see above), August 11 ਀ഊ

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਀ഊIn that book I was reading on the plane home from Miami (Carrie Pilby by Caren Lessner), the girl was a child prodigy who had gone through most of her life believing what she called "The Big Lie" -- that once she got to college there would be people like her. Smart people, intellectual people, serious people, whatever you want to call it. And then she went to Harvard and found that even there she didn't fit in... Now this is not totally applicable to me, since I've never been particularly a "prodigy", nor have I ever really been an outcast. But for a long time I used to believe that I would meet people like me at college, kind of how I did at Nerd Camp... then, meeting a bunch of other nerdy quirky kids was like a revalation that I wasn't alone in the world. But now, not being a 12-year old with black-and-white world view, I have a much broader definition of what people like me means. I'm not exactly requiring that every person I'm friends with be a complete genius... more I'd prefer that they be sweet, sympathetic, people who have a modicum of intelligence - and not necessarily "book smarts", either. More just the ability to carry on a conversation and to have opinions that you can and will defend. I'm no longer entirely sure where I was going with this rant... oh right, I suppose I just don't want to have unrealistic expectations that college will be some kind of intellectual and social paradise. ਀ഊ

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਀ഊJo, 19, California, July 16 ਀ഊ

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਀ഊi've begun a new chapter in my life. i tried coldstones ice cream for the first time a month ago. i went to my first concert ever... anywhos. i'm going to advertise the funniest book i've ever read. such a nerd, huh? reading in the middle of the summer. anyways. Carrie Pilby by Caren Lissner...go read it.
਀ഊ[EXCERPT FROM BOOK]:"The most concrete evidence for men being from another planet is the difference between the personal ads from women and men. As i wander through the "women seeking men," i notice that the women list the following qualities to describe themselves: smart, sensitive, love animals, love long walks on the beach, love museums, love books. they sound like kind, interesting people. the men don't list their hobbies; they stick to specifying what they want, which is someone "sexy" and "vivacious." what's funny is, the men don't care to hide their own visual inadequacies. two of them say they "look like Anthony Edwards," which just means they're bald. they're lucky that a bald guy got on TV and got famous so they can convey this in some oblique way. i see there is one guy who wants a woman who is "rubenesque." thank god for variety."
਀ഊGosh. i love how shes so bitterly cynical w/ life...and heres the best part of the book that simply describes my lack of understanding for something like marriage...
਀ഊ[EXCERPT]: i used to be romantic like everyone else when i was little, and i figured that marriage was something that happened because it was "meant to be." but lately i've been wondering if it's just a necessary social convention. maybe we've stuck with it because if you don't have at least one person in this rotten world who is bound contractually to back you up when everyone else wants to roll you over with a cement truck, you'll end up wanting to kill yourself. so you sign this contract with someone saying you're going to care about them and support them and not stab them in the back, no matter what happens in life and no matter how old and wrinkly and ugly you both get, and they're supposed to do the same. if we didn't have large numbers of people doing this, the world would get too confusing and probably more lonely than it already is. ਀ഊ

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਀ഊSomeone in Southeast Asia, maybe, Sept. 08 ਀ഊ

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਀ഊBaru-baru ini gue baca buku yang judulnya Carrie Pilby. Bukunya bercerita tentang seorang cewek jenius lulusan Harvard bernama Carrie, yang meskipun otaknya amat sangat cemerlang, tapi sama sekali nggak bisa ngerti tentang kehidupan sosial. Sepanjang buku ini, kita bisa liat gimana Carrie belajar memandang kehidupan dengan perspektif abu", dan bukan hanya berdasarkan hitam/putih aja. ਀ഊ

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਀ഊBusby, August ਀ഊ

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਀ഊMore Updates: (Books) Megan Mcafferty...Sloppy Firsts and Second Helpings. Both are very good. Also, Caren Lissner's Carrie Pilby I love that one. It's about an extremely intelligent girl and her mental struggles dealing with hypocrites, her shrink, sex, and leaving her apartment. ਀ഊ

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਀ഊLib’s Journal, July 26 ਀ഊ

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਀ഊJust finished reading a book called Carrie Pilby. I would recommend it to anyone. It was a very interesting book about an extremely intelligent girl prodigy who at 19 is out of college and in the real world. Sorta. It deals a lot with the ideas of personal morality, absolute truths and the importance of sex in our lives (as in many people are sex-obessed). I was rather surprised with the whole thing to be honest. First, it's published by Red Dress Ink which is a divison of Harlequin. Usually RDI books are a more realistic romance novel dealing primarily with modern women and modern situations. Think along the lines of an American Bridget Jones' Diary. So, I get this book because it sounds interesting and I discover it's an RDI book. Fine, I assume it's going to be a fast read with a happy ending, right? Right. Sorta. LOL...I guess it's just that there was a lot more depth and a lot less sex--to be blunt. So anyway...enough discussion, read it, tell me what you think. ਀ഊ

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਀ഊR’s site ਀ഊ

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਀ഊI FINALLY GOT MY DRIVERS LICENSE!!! got there at 445 AM, was 18th in line, read carrie pilby for 3 hours (omg- i love that book, "ever wonder if those braille numbers in the elevator are really curse words"...haha, i actually laughed out loud and people were looking at me strange) ਀ഊ

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਀ഊJ., Aug. 26 ਀ഊ

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਀ഊChick-lit is a genre I want to love, but it's pretty tough finding good chick-lit books. I have no qualms about reading chick-lit. I think we all need some fluff in our lives. I loved Carrie Pilby because the narrator is a young genius who looks at the world in a wonderfully offbeat way. Her interest in etymology and her feelings on why you shouldn't tell people what videos you're renting are worth the entire book, although I was also impressed by the ending. What I hate about most chick-lit books is that there are no surprises. When the guy is handsome and named Ethan or some nice name like that, you know he's Mr. Right. Carrie Pilby rose above that. ਀ഊ

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਀ഊTawny, August 25 ਀ഊ

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਀ഊI just finished Carrie Pilby. It's a Red Dress Ink Novel. Carrie references David Foster Wallace's Infinite Jest and I actually knew what she was talking about. It was a smart book and a fun book at the same time. I'd like to say I couldn't put it down, but that's not true. I could, and did, put it down -- but only because I had too many other things to do. I think though, even with all the other things I had to do this week, that it says something that it only took me a week to read. I want to say something about Carrie but I won't because I don't want to influence anyone who is reading or who plans to read the book. I liked her a lot -- so it isn't anything negative. I guess if anyone reads it, they can email me and tell me what they thought and then I'll tell them what I thought. Or whatever. The back of the book also lists some other Red Dress Ink Novels. Since I'll probably lend this one to Kym while she's here, I better get these other titles and authors somewhere that I won't lose them. ਀ഊ

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਀ഊS., Aug 26 ਀ഊ

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਀ഊI just finished Carrie Pilby. I especially identified with this book. It is a character study of a highly intelligent young girl trying to understand others' hypocrisy and situational ethics. Having just graduated from Harvard at the age of nineteen, Carrie lives alone in a Manhattan apartment. Jaded and cynical, she visits a therapist who devises a plan to help her assimilate into society. Although having fulfilled the requirements of the plan, Carrie's unflagging commitment to her belief system prevents her from gaining any substantial benefit. She hasn't become Manhattan's premier social butterfly, but she has at least developed some new insights and acknowledged shades of gray in her black and white world of right and wrong. ਀ഊ

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਀ഊJune 20 ਀ഊ

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਀ഊCall Me Carrie For my birthday, Dee gave me a $20 gift certificate to Borders. Ben, from work, told me once that it's good to get books in pairs, that way, once you finish the first, you can go straight into the second without losing your momentum. So, as one of my books, I bought Carrie Pilby by Caren Lissner. I picked it up, because after reading the back, I realized that it wasn't one of those "thirty year old women from London trying to find a man" books (none of which I am- thirty, single or from London) . My intent was to give it to Charlie for her graduation gift- seeing as though the character had just graduated from college herself, but I couldn't fight the temptation to pick it up and start reading. Anyone who could stand it- cos I'll admit, some of the things Carrie thinks and does could be annoying in real life - should know that I was just like Carrie 5 years ago. The whole ordeal about hypocrites and how the world and society is just horrible was soooo me. Of course, I was never a child prodigy who skipped 3 grades and graduated from Harvard. But, the way she philosophizes about society is interesting and raises a brow. I would say that it's a modern day Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger. Those who loved Catcher, and who then have read Carrie, may disagree and find that insulting- but I use that comparison because the main characters run parrellel in the way they see the world. The character development is apparent in both novels although in Carrie, she doesn't end up in an insane assylum, so I could say that it ends a bit more happily than Catcher. "I feel ebullient. I wonder if this is the way other people feel all the time. Maybe I do usually suffer from depression. Maybe the way I feel now, everyone else feels most of the time, and that's why they're so much more comfortable with the world than I am. Maybe it's chemical.... How would I know, if I've never felt any way other than the way I usually am? And this feeling I feel now, what if I can replicate it with antidepressants? Even if they're drugs, so what - if I can feel this good with them, why shouldn't I? Is this what it's all about? ...But that whole idea is something to think about, the question of whether we should reject anything that could make us feel better. Even if it's a drug." -Carrie Pilby, p 306 I set an appointment for the doctor this coming Monday. I figured I'd get all the shots I haven't already gotten (I don't keep track), get a physical, and just make sure everything is in tip-top shape. ਀ഊ

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਀ഊSept. 4 ਀ഊ

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਀ഊ[2:26 pm] Carrie Pilby Great book! I finished today. Now I'm reading "Who Made God?" Good question, I think. Anyway Carrie Pilby is a wonderful read! I feel like Carrie a lot. I just don't have those genius genes. I am fairly smart, though. In the last part of the book, Carrie realizes that she loves all that she hated: the city, her self, her life, her independane from societal influences, etc. I am a lot like her. I too have declared independance from societal influences. In fact, I spend most of my time alone because of it. I also have this love and passion for NYC. I don't know what it is or really where it came from, but I have had this desire since I was a little girl. Maybe it stuck with me b/c my dad said that I wasn't taking any of his money to NYC! Guess what, Daddy! I have taken my own damn money twice!!! Sure everything in NYC is expensive. Sure it's loud and dirty and unfriendly. But some how it seems almost romantic to me to be capable of befriending such a place. Maybe I am wrong. I guess I will find out some day. ਀ഊ

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Carrie Pilby Harlequin Teen edition
2010 Harlequin Teen edition
Carrie Pilby (original)
2003 American edition
Carrie Pilby (original)
2003 Australian edition
Carrie Pilby (original)
Starting From Square Two (2004)
Carrie Pilby (original)
Scenes From A Holiday (2005)
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